Sepsis can do a lot of harm to your body. From shutting down the body’s organs to causing blood clots that block the flow of blood, sometimes the damage is irreparable.

With sepsis, the blood’s clotting mechanism can go into overdrive and cause blockages inside the blood vessels. When blood can’t pass through the blood vessels, oxygen and vital nutrients can’t get to the body’s tissues. If the tissues can’t get the nourishment they need, the tissues die.

When too much of the tissue dies, it has to be removed. Sometimes, doctors can remove just a small part, but other times, more drastic measures must be taken and parts of the body must be amputated.

For some people, amputations are limited to their fingers or toes, or parts of them. Others, however, may need amputations of their hands, feet, even arms or legs, all in an effort to save their life.

To learn more about amputations and life after sepsis, visit Life After Sepsis: Amputations

 

Information regarding sepsis and amputations is also available as a Sepsis Information Guide, which is a downloadable format for easier printing.

Would you like to share your story about sepsis or read about others who have had sepsis? Please visit Faces of Sepsis, where you will find hundreds of stories from survivors and tributes to those who died from sepsis.