Diagnosed with Sepsis

You’re not alone

For anyone recently diagnosed with sepsis, this is the place to start. We cover the basics.

What Does it Mean

Faces of Sepsis

You’re not alone

Read stories from sepsis survivors and from people who have lost someone they love to sepsis. More than 1,000 stories cover the many types of infections that can cause sepsis, and the outcomes.

Learn More

Kristan Seaford

Survivor

On Sunday, November 24 of 2013, I woke up at 5 AM with a severe fever, chills, headache, nausea, difficulty breathing, and sore throat. The night before I’d started to feel ill, but nothing like this. As a mom of five kids (aged 1-11), who had been passing around the flu and strep throat, I could have seen this coming. (Sepsis and Strep Throat) But moms don’t get sick days, right? Usually, I push through; however, this was different. I sent the clan to church with my husband, promising to stay in bed and rest so I’d be better by …

Learn More
faces of sepsis
Faces of Sepsis
Poster
ViewDownload
What is Sepsis?
Infographic
ViewDownload

Military & Veterans

Many of today’s life saving medical and surgical procedures were first discovered or refined by the military.

Learn More

Mental Health

Sepsis survivors and family members of people who have had sepsis may find themselves experiencing emotional and psychological issues that can make it difficult to move forward.

Find Help

It’s About Time™

It’s About TIME™ is a national initiative to raise awareness of sepsis and the urgent need to seek treatment when symptoms are recognized.

Early detection is the best hope to survive and limit disabilities when sepsis is present.
Learn More

Erin’s Campaign for Kids

IN MEMORY OF ERIN BUG FLATLEY | 1978 – 2002

Erin’s Campaign for Kids aims to combat the high incidence and mortality rates of sepsis among children. The campaign creates awards and training programs for nurses and other health professionals to help identify and treat a disease that, by conservative estimates, causes over 18 child deaths per day or 6,800 child deaths in the United States every year, more than pediatric cancers.

Learn More