Diagnosed with Sepsis

You’re not alone

For anyone recently diagnosed with sepsis, this is the place to start. We cover the basics.

What Does it Mean

Faces of Sepsis

You’re not alone

Read stories from sepsis survivors and from people who have lost someone they love to sepsis. More than 1,000 stories cover the many types of infections that can cause sepsis, and the outcomes.

Learn More

Rosie Vento

Survivor

It was the Wednesday before Super Bowl weekend, 2017, when my daughter, age 7, needed to be picked up from school because she had a slight fever. I had left work a little early to get her not knowing the would be the last time I would walk out of my office. In addition to her being sick and wanting her mommy, I fell sick at the same time. I was at work and kept urinating, which is odd for me because I usually hold it pretty well. I remember standing in my office and getting an unbelievably sharp pain …

Read storyView All Faces

Kathleen Hickey

Survivor, Survivor

16th February 2017, I was sent into hospital to be induced for my son as I was 13 days overdue. The pessarie didn’t work so the midwife tried to pop my waters…. this is where the nightmare starts! (Sepsis and Pregnancy & Childbirth) As soon as she popped my waters, my baby’s heart beat decreased suddenly and I had a lot of blood coming out. Then all the midwives were rushing me into another room, strapping me to all these monitors and I had to have a canula put in my hand and on a drip. When I got to …

Read storyView All Faces

Nur Syaqiela

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

My baby, Nur Syaqiela, was born on March 15, 2014, delivered as a normal procedure. She was healthy, weighted 2.81 kg. She had light jaundice and day after day my baby’s growth was very good, until August 30, 2014. My baby had chicken pox. Some people said, don’t give medicine, because it can interrupt the chicken pox. So during the chicken pox, my baby got fever 38 to 40 degrees Celsius. We went to the hospital and the doctor just gave antibiotics and “felamine.” After 4 days, my baby stomach inflated, became very obvious, so we went to the hospital …

Read storyView All Faces

Jan B.

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

This was my Facebook post for Sepsis Awareness Month: I’m not really sure why I’m alive today. There is no real reason why so many people in my situation die or suffer organ failure or lose their hands, arms, and feet, and I walked out of the ICU and returned to work 30 days later. There is no doubt whatsoever that I had bacterial pneumonia in advanced stages for a long time before I was hospitalized last Valentine’s Day. (Sepsis and Pneumonia) I had been feeling drained, out of breath going up simple stairs, my fingers turned dark and tingled …

Read storyView All Faces

Racheal Acuff

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

On June 20th 2018 I was diagnosed with sepsis and toxic shock syndrome along with DIC due to kidney infection and pneumonia. (Sepsis and Toxic Shock Syndrome, Sepsis and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC), Sepsis and Pneumonia) I went into multi organ failure including my kidneys, which shut completely down, causing me to need dialysis. I was on a ventilator, no longer breathing on my own and I was put into a medically induced coma and was given less than a 3% chance of survival, but survive I did. After 4 weeks on a vent/trach, I began to breathe on my …

Read storyView All Faces
faces of sepsis
Faces of Sepsis
Poster
ViewDownload
What is Sepsis?
Infographic
ViewDownload

Military & Veterans

Many of today’s life saving medical and surgical procedures were first discovered or refined by the military.

Learn More

Mental Health

Sepsis survivors and family members of people who have had sepsis may find themselves experiencing emotional and psychological issues that can make it difficult to move forward.

Find Help

It’s About Time™

It’s About TIME™ is a national initiative to raise awareness of sepsis and the urgent need to seek treatment when symptoms are recognized.

Early detection is the best hope to survive and limit disabilities when sepsis is present.
Learn More

Erin’s Campaign for Kids

IN MEMORY OF ERIN BUG FLATLEY | 1978 – 2002

Erin’s Campaign for Kids aims to combat the high incidence and mortality rates of sepsis among children. The campaign creates awards and training programs for nurses and other health professionals to help identify and treat a disease that, by conservative estimates, causes over 18 child deaths per day or 6,800 child deaths in the United States every year, more than pediatric cancers.

Learn More