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Diagnosed with Sepsis

You’re not alone

For anyone recently diagnosed with sepsis, this is the place to start. We cover the basics.

What Does it Mean

Faces of Sepsis

You’re not alone

Read stories from sepsis survivors and from people who have lost someone they love to sepsis. More than 1,000 stories cover the many types of infections that can cause sepsis, and the outcomes.

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Kayla Ferrer

Survivor

Kayla was admitted for hip pain then became septic due to osteomyelitis of the hip, which was also MRSA. Due to her asthma she got pneumonia. (Sepsis and MRSA, Sepsis and Pneumonia) Kayla was intubated two days after being admitted. Went into surgery to remove the infection but unfortunately her heart was failing she received two rounds of chest compressions and was placed on ECMO. Kayla was not getting any better her left lung was completely collapsed after a bronchoscopy that an RT recommended. From one day to another she showed so much improvement. After 7 days on ECMO she …

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Doug Peters

Survivor, Survivor

In 2018 started to experience swollen foot, dizziness and hallucinations. Went to a number of specialists, including labs and imaging. My foot hurt the most and all Doctors said it was diabetes and to keep it raised. (Sepsis and Hallucinations) Several blamed it on drinking which I do admit was issue, however I was not and still not diabetic. Finally one day in Nov could not get out of bed for appointment. Grown daughter was at home checking up on me and Mother. She called a visiting nurse and they did come that day. Within minutes of checking my vitals …

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Judith Lipton

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

I nearly died of sepsis almost exactly one year ago, starting on May 22, 2020. I want to tell my story especially since I may be among the few people who have lived through severe encephalopathy and survived without incapacitating brain damage. I also want to educate people about the signs of sepsis, and the need for informed consent. Thanks for listening to me. Even though I am a physician myself and my husband is a professional biologist, we did not recognize the initial signs of sepsis. We should have gone to the hospital right away, as soon as I …

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Molly G.

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

Christmas Day 2013 I woke up not feeling good. I had been fighting horrible back pain for almost a year so it wasn’t unusual. We were supposed to join relatives for the day but we canceled so I went up to bed. A little later I tried to go downstairs for water but stumbled and when husband ask how I was I could only mumble. At that point he packed me up and took me to ER. They did not see any signs of illness except my mental state and high temperature. They began antibiotic IV and decided to intubate …

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Gerald H. Williams

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

Well, a year ago, I was having lower side/back pain and could hardly walk. I called doctor that asked me the level of pain out of 10. My reply was 15+. His answer was go to the clinic so I did., The doctor on duty asked me a few questions and said I had a kidney stone on the move. (Sepsis and Kidney Stones) Sent me to the hospital with a note. Upon arriving at hospital, I was immediately met and assessed and put on a bed. Off to the ultra sound and an x-ray. 20 minute later was told …

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Faces of Sepsis
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What is Sepsis?
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Military & Veterans

Many of today’s life saving medical and surgical procedures were first discovered or refined by the military.

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Mental Health

Sepsis survivors and family members of people who have had sepsis may find themselves experiencing emotional and psychological issues that can make it difficult to move forward.

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It’s About Time™

It’s About TIME™ is a national initiative to raise awareness of sepsis and the urgent need to seek treatment when symptoms are recognized.

Early detection is the best hope to survive and limit disabilities when sepsis is present.
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Erin’s Campaign for Kids

IN MEMORY OF ERIN BUG FLATLEY | 1978 – 2002

Erin’s Campaign for Kids aims to combat the high incidence and mortality rates of sepsis among children. The campaign creates awards and training programs for nurses and other health professionals to help identify and treat a disease that, by conservative estimates, causes over 18 child deaths per day or 6,800 child deaths in the United States every year, more than pediatric cancers.

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