Diagnosed with Sepsis

You’re not alone

For anyone recently diagnosed with sepsis, this is the place to start. We cover the basics.

What Does it Mean

Faces of Sepsis

You’re not alone

Read stories from sepsis survivors and from people who have lost someone they love to sepsis. More than 1,000 stories cover the many types of infections that can cause sepsis, and the outcomes.

Learn More

Kirsten Lavine

Survivor

I have always been in very good health, which I attribute to having an active lifestyle and being a long-term vegan. However, I also have a condition called endometriosis which has impacted on my life in a few minor ways. In recent years I developed irregular bleeding in the midst of my menstrual cycle, and concerned that it might have indicated a pre-cancerous state, I agreed to have a diagnostic hysteroscopy in July 2015. The day surgery went smoothly and the results of the biopsy later proved to be negative. That night, however, I began to have horrific abdominal pain. …

Read storyView All Faces

Kathy Lewis

Survivor, Survivor

I awoke one morning last March (2014) feeling a bit under the weather but ok to go to work. As the day progressed, I started feeling nauseous, then became uncontrollably sick. I went home, thinking I’ll rest at home and feel better. I kept feeling worse with developing lower back pain. My son called an ambulance and I was transported to the ER. It was discovered that I had a kidney stone and beginnings of a UTI. (Sepsis and Kidney Stones, Sepsis and UTI) I was admitted, receiving a stent and antibiotics. After a few days, I was advised that …

Read storyView All Faces

Lynda Martin

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

My story is one of survival, and I count myself fortunate. My story starts with my mother’s illness, and subsequently with my brother’s. Their stories are not as happy, but provide a necessary backdrop to mine. In October 2014, my mother was diagnosed with a kidney infection caused by stone that could not be removed due to advanced scoliosis. After having tried to insert stents, the urologist decided that her anatomy made any attempt to remove the stone to dangerous. He decided to insert a nephrostomy tube as a permanent solution for draining her left kidney. In December she was …

Read storyView All Faces

Bert D

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

In Oct 2017 I went to work and had bad coal mining accident. I was burnt to 54% of my body, 1st degree on my face, 3rd degree on my left arm legs and back. And 4th degree on my right arm It was so bad they used plastic skin to repair it. (Sepsis and Burns) I was in ICU for about a month in a induced coma. There were 9 tubes inserted in my neck to feed me and drugs. When in ICU I had 9 skin graft operations. In one of those operations my heart stopped but they …

Read storyView All Faces

Jessica Edwards

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

I am a paramedic and have been taught to know all the signs and symptoms of sepsis – yet that didn’t make me immune from becoming a victim of it myself. However, by being able to recognize what was happening and advocate for myself in the ER, I was able to survive a moderate case over 2 years ago. My story began when I noticed that I had developed an abscess on the inside of my butt cheek. I went to my doctor (who is also a friend of mine and former boss) and was prescribed an antibiotic and was …

Read storyView All Faces
faces of sepsis
Faces of Sepsis
Poster
ViewDownload
What is Sepsis?
Infographic
ViewDownload

Military & Veterans

Many of today’s life saving medical and surgical procedures were first discovered or refined by the military.

Learn More

Mental Health

Sepsis survivors and family members of people who have had sepsis may find themselves experiencing emotional and psychological issues that can make it difficult to move forward.

Find Help

It’s About Time™

It’s About TIME™ is a national initiative to raise awareness of sepsis and the urgent need to seek treatment when symptoms are recognized.

Early detection is the best hope to survive and limit disabilities when sepsis is present.
Learn More

Erin’s Campaign for Kids

IN MEMORY OF ERIN BUG FLATLEY | 1978 – 2002

Erin’s Campaign for Kids aims to combat the high incidence and mortality rates of sepsis among children. The campaign creates awards and training programs for nurses and other health professionals to help identify and treat a disease that, by conservative estimates, causes over 18 child deaths per day or 6,800 child deaths in the United States every year, more than pediatric cancers.

Learn More