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Kathy R.

Survivor

I was admitted to the hospital for a laparoscopic appendectomy and partial colectomy on Nov. 4, 2021. (Sepsis and Surgery) I live alone in VA so my best friend from NY came to stay with me. She packed for 7-10 days. I was released on the 4th and the next day exhibited symptoms such as black and blue marks down my thigh, headache and pain.

Luckily, my friend noticed I was getting worse, not better and on the 7th called 911. This is where my memory stopped. I was rushed to the hospital and the doctors told my friend my organs were failing, I was in septic shock and they didn’t know if I would make it through the night. (Sepsis and Septic Shock) My brother was called and he left NY the next day and came to VA.

I was in ICU for 8 days and in the hospital for 5 weeks. I finally woke up in ICU but didn’t even recognize my brother. After the fact, I learned all the gory details of what was done, transfusions, temporary pacemaker, my chest cavity had to be drained, etc. I was sent to rehab because I couldn’t walk on my own and had serious brain fog. I was released with a JP drain and had to have a home care RN 3 times a week to drain it and check for infection.

Now, I am home and suffering with post-sepsis syndrome after 2 months. I have a poor appetite, although it’s improving. This may sound petty because I survived sepsis, but my hair is falling out, which is so upsetting, and finger nails are cracking very low on the nail causing discomfort. I meditate to keep the anxiety at bay, but it’s been quite an ordeal. My last comment is that after surgery all patients should be given information about what to look for once you are home to avoid infection that could lead to sepsis. I had no idea about post sepsis syndrome until I researched on my own and discovered why I have such a loss of hair. If my friend wasn’t staying with me, I’m sure I wouldn’t be here to write this.
Thank you for allowing me to tell my story.
Kathy

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