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Diagnosed with Sepsis

You’re not alone

For anyone recently diagnosed with sepsis, this is the place to start. We cover the basics.

What Does it Mean

Faces of Sepsis

You’re not alone

Read stories from sepsis survivors and from people who have lost someone they love to sepsis. More than 1,000 stories cover the many types of infections that can cause sepsis, and the outcomes.

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Kayla Ferrer

Survivor

Kayla was admitted for hip pain then became septic due to osteomyelitis of the hip, which was also MRSA. Due to her asthma she got pneumonia. (Sepsis and MRSA, Sepsis and Pneumonia) Kayla was intubated two days after being admitted. Went into surgery to remove the infection but unfortunately her heart was failing she received two rounds of chest compressions and was placed on ECMO. Kayla was not getting any better her left lung was completely collapsed after a bronchoscopy that an RT recommended. From one day to another she showed so much improvement. After 7 days on ECMO she …

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Duffy Jennings

Survivor, Survivor

When I knelt down in a dusty Lake Tahoe campground one day last summer, something as infinitesimal as a speck of gravel punctured the skin on my kneecap, not painful enough for me to notice but just enough let in a virulent bug. (Sepsis and Bacterial Infections) For the next two weeks, that insidious microorganism grew undetected into a rampant infection that damned near killed me. By the time I finally showed up at the hospital, doctors told me, I had a day, maybe two, before septic shock would start shutting down my vital organs one by one until my …

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Barbie Nesser

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

Hi my name is Barbie and I am 62 years old. It was June of 2020 when I had my 4th UTI in 6 months. (Sepsis and Urinary Tract Infections) I was prescribed Macrobid on June 10th. By Friday I was experiencing back pain. It was late in the day, but I decided to call my primary doctor. Luckily my doctor called me back. She asked if we could FaceTime. My doctor thought I did not look very well and I also developed a stye in my eye and I never had them before. It was evident that I was …

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Dina M.

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

2019 has been overwhelming. My body was telling me something was wrong. I went to the doctor and expressed my concern that I was experiencing symptoms of a UTI. My doctor ordered labs, but I never received a call nor was anything prescribed to me. My white blood count was a little high but my other cultures came back negative, and that’s where it ended. So I thought. (Sepsis and Urinary Tract Infections) A few weeks later, I started having back pain. I didn’t think much of it since I’m always on the go and I had been very busy …

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Kari Wilford

Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor, Survivor

I had surgery to save my left kidney in August 2019. Within a day of being released from the hospital, I had severe joint pain and a rising fever. (Sepsis and Surgery) The next day I woke up with chills so I called my doctor who assumed I probably picked up a bug and put me on antibiotics. A few more days went by and I went to the ER because I was feeling run down and the antibiotic didn’t seem to be helping. The ER doctor put me on a different antibiotic and thankfully told me to drop everything …

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Faces of Sepsis
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What is Sepsis?
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Military & Veterans

Many of today’s life saving medical and surgical procedures were first discovered or refined by the military.

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Mental Health

Sepsis survivors and family members of people who have had sepsis may find themselves experiencing emotional and psychological issues that can make it difficult to move forward.

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It’s About Time™

It’s About TIME™ is a national initiative to raise awareness of sepsis and the urgent need to seek treatment when symptoms are recognized.

Early detection is the best hope to survive and limit disabilities when sepsis is present.
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Erin’s Campaign for Kids

IN MEMORY OF ERIN BUG FLATLEY | 1978 – 2002

Erin’s Campaign for Kids aims to combat the high incidence and mortality rates of sepsis among children. The campaign creates awards and training programs for nurses and other health professionals to help identify and treat a disease that, by conservative estimates, causes over 18 child deaths per day or 6,800 child deaths in the United States every year, more than pediatric cancers.

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